Quote of the Month

There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.

~Mirabel Osler






Wednesday, 11 June 2014

AGC Meeting June 10th 2014

Holiday in Morocco and Progress in the Drought Resistant Garden of Andrew Sloan
 Andrew visited the AGC 18 months ago from his home in Alhaurin.
The report of his visit can be found here in the AGC Website:-
http://axarquiagardenclub.blogspot.com.es/2012/11/agc-november-2012-meeting-photo-album.html

This time....
[The Club was initially entertained by the oft-performed “Let’s Just Check if We Can Show the Slides” – with Andrew, his lovely wife Margarita and an Ayuntamiento “expert”
The State-of-the Art equipment installed at the behest of the Mayor refused to work without the Mayor himself being present ! Accordingly, it was decided to go back into the waiting arms of some Older Technology. This too proved to be a problem until it was discovered that the Extension Cable had not actually been switched on.
What came after that was almost bound to be an anti-climax!]
However, Andrew (with Margarita on the keyboard for the Slides) took us to Morocco, reliving their MGS Visit earlier this year!
(Mediterranean Garden Society)
MGS Concentrates on the following parts of the World

Several features of the Morocco tour were highlighted –

The goats eating the fruit of the Argan Tree. (right) They deposit the stones in their dung and  the herdsmen rescue those nuts to process into  Argan Oil.

The unusual height of the Moroccan  Olive Trees – here in Spain, an olive tree is kept short so that a man  in the ground can easily divest it of its fruit. In Morocco – men are lifted into the trees (willingly?) in order to complete the harvest.




The MSG visited several beautiful, private gardens which were totally different from the usual type in Spain
In Marakesh, Andrew & Margarita played “hooky” in order to pay a lengthy visit to the Souk instead.
Casablanca showed them huge euphorbias which prompted Andrew to warn us against the sap of these succulents – it can be lethal! It causes serious burns wherever it touches the body and can even be responsible for blindness. One goes to hospital immediately one touches it!
Just north of Fez, they visited the ruins of the most southerly outpost of the Roman Empire – Volubilis. They we overwhelmed with these ruins and captivated by the Tour Guide’s information.
We saw photos of startlingly red, russet and ochre sedum plants. They turn these colours when stressed - drought will do it every time

Andrew had been advised to ensure that the cacti-succulent gardens he was creating incorporated sufficient shade for the plants and also rocks to shade the roots.
He is justly proud of the range of Cacti & Succulents he has manged to grow from seed following various “Seed Swaps” via the Facebook  Planet Aloe.
Indeed, he reports :-
This is one of the 3 aloe burhii I germinated 3 years ago. It is one of the quicker and less common aloes and very attractive. It caused quite a stir amongst the Californians when I posted this photo on Planet Aloe.
We were left with a variety of memorable details from the lecture, chief amongst which was a desire by most to get on a coach that afternoon and go to visit the Roman Ruins at Volubilis, staying at the lovely Hotel there.
Personally –
In future, I shall always refer to myself as “Having a Sedum Moment” whenever I feel stressed!

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